Coverage and Uptake of Syphilis Screening among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care: A 5-Year Review in Plateau State, Nigeria

  • F A Magaji JOS University Teaching Hospital, JOS, Nigeria.
  • A N Ocheke Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria.
  • V C Pam Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria.
  • T Afolaramin Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria.
  • J Musa Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria.
  • A S Sagay Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria.
  • A I Zoakah Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria.
Keywords: Plateau state, Pregnancy, Syphilis, Screening, Uptake

Abstract

Nigeria is one of the high-burden countries in sub-Saharan Africa for syphilis and along with other sexually
transmitted infections contributes to reproductive health morbidities and mortalities. This study was aimed
at determining the coverage and uptake among the pregnant population in Plateau state Nigeria. The
study was a 5-year descriptive analysis of syphilis screening services among pregnant women in Plateau
state, Nigeria based on data generated between January 2012 and December 2016. The data on syphilis
screening services were managed through the electronic Nigerian National HIV/AIDS Response Information
Management System (eNNRIMS) which was a web-based software. The data was disaggregated by year,
prenatal registration, and outcome of syphilis test in the software and analysis was done using excel to
obtained the proportions and trend of syphilis screening uptake among the pregnant population. Out of
a total of 199,104 that registered for antenatal care, only 55,028 (27.6%) got tested for syphilis, and 618
(1.1%) tested positive. The coverage and uptake of syphilis screening services was very low with a high
percentage of missed opportunity to identify and treat cases of syphilis in Plateau state.

References

1. World health organization (WHOa). Global Incidence
and Prevalence of selected curable Sexually Transmitted
Infections; WHO, Geneva. 2012.
2. World health organization (WHOb). The global
elimination of congenital syphilis: rational and strategy
for action. Geneva: World Health Organization. 2007.
3. Schmid G, Rowley J, Samuelson J. Global incidence
and prevalence of four curable sexually transmitted
infections (STIs): new estimates from WHO. In:
Proceedings of the 2nd Global HIV/AIDS Surveillance
Meeting (ISSTDR), London, UK. 2009.
4. Lynn WA, Lightman S. Syphilis and HIV: a dangerous
combination. Lancet Infect Dis 2004; 4: 456-66.
5. Watson-Jones D, Oliff M, Terris-Prestholt F, et al.
Antenatal syphilis screening in sub-Saharan Africa:
Lessons learned from Tanzania. Trop Med Int Health
2009; 10(9): 934- 43.
6. Newman L, Kamb M, Hawkes S, et al. Global Estimate
of syphilis in pregnancy and associated outcomes:
analysis of multinational antenatal surveillance data.
PLOS Medicine 2013; 10: e1001396.
7. Mulu A, Kassu A, Tessema B. Sero-prevalence of syphilis
and HIV-1 during pregnancy in a teaching hospital in
northwest Ethiopia. Jpn J Infect Dis 2007; 60: 193-5.
8. Tessema B, Yismaw G, Kassu A. Ser-prevalence of HIV,
HBV, HCV and Syphilis infections among blood donors
at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, northwest
Ethiopia: declining trends over a period of five years.
BMC Infect Dis 2010; 10: 111.
9. Ministry of Health (MOHa). Disease Prevention and
Control department. AIDS in Ethiopia. Technical
document for the fifth report. Addis Ababa. 2004.
10. Ministry of Health (MOHb). National HIV Prevention
and Control Office. AIDS in Ethiopia. Sixth report. Addis
Ababa. 2006.
11. Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH). Ethiopian Health
and Nutrition Research Institute Report on the 2007
round antenatal care sentinel HIV surveillance in
Ethiopia, Addis Ababa. 2010.
12. Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute.
Report on the 2009 round antenatal care sentinel HIV
surveillance in Ethiopia, Addis Ababa. 2011.
13. Mullick S, Watson-Jones D, Beksinska M, et al. Sexually
Transmitted infections in pregnancy: prevalence,
impact on pregnancy outcomes, and approach to
treatment in developing countries. Sex Transm Infect
2005; 81: 294-302.
14. Wolff T, Shelton E, Sessions C. Screening for syphilis
infection in pregnant women: evidence for the
US. Preventive Service Task Force Reaffirmation
Recommendation Statement. Ann Intern Med 2009;
150 (10): 710.
15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually
Transmitted Disease Surveillance, 2012.
16. Gomez GB, Kamb ML, Newman LM, et al. Untreated
maternal syphilis and adverse outcomes of pregnancy:
a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Bull
World Health Organization 2013; 91: 217-26.
17. Watson-Jones D, Oliff M, Terris-Prestholt F, et al.
Antenatal syphilis screening in sub-Saharan Africa:
lessons learned from Tanzania. Trop Med Int Health
2009; 10(9): 934- 43.
18. Gloyd S, Chai S, Mercer MA. Antenatal syphilis in sub-
Saharan Africa: missed opportunities for mortality
reduction. Health Policy Plan 2001; 16(1): 29-34.
19. Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH). National AIDS &
STIs Control Programme, Annual Report on HIV/AIDS
Health Sector Response in Nigeria. 2016.
Published
2018-09-20